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3 Ways to Increase Board Engagement in 2014

By January 2, 2014 No Comments

Tom Massey, SVP of Daxko’s T2 Consulting, describes a board of directors as the leaders of an organization, responsible for creating and improving key strategies. Because a board is so integral to nonprofit success, it is worth looking at some easy ways to help enable and empower a board to do their best work. Bill Hoffman of the consulting firm, Bill Hoffman and Associates lists three ways to help your board in the Guide Star article: “How to Engage Nonprofit Board Members.” Check out these 3 ways to increase board engagement to create a more effective board of directors:
 
1. “Make it easy” by providing a centralized location for all information regarding the board of directors.
 
Whether it’s a board meeting calendar and invitations, historical board meeting minutes, or the most up-to-date bylaws, a centralized location can make it easier for board members to be more engaged.
 
2. “Show them the good, the bad, and the ugly” by being transparent.
 
Provide all information in a timely fashion to board members so they have an accurate portrayal of successes, issues, and challenges of the organization. “If we didn’t see the good that can be accomplished, we would have a tough time fighting many everyday battles…” Conversely, if you only show the good, a board member might assume their talents aren’t needed. Being transparent with your board not only helps the board stay motivated, but it helps keep both staff and board members accountable.
 
3. “Work them” efficiently.
 
Providing space in committee meetings or online committee rooms with discussion forums and live chat means that much of the administrative work of a board can take place outside of scheduled meetings. This allows board meetings to focus on the most strategic items. Taking care of business both online and in person not only makes best use of board members limited time, but it also helps make the best use of board members unique skill set. Board members need to see that they are critical to the success of the organization’s mission and that their talent on the board makes a difference. It’s important to give them the opportunities and room to make that difference.

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