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Our Customer Survey Philosophy

By | Customer Experience, Engagement, Industry, Organizational Health, Trends Reports & Surveys | No Comments

“Where DOES my feedback really go?”

At Daxko, each and every team member takes your feedback very seriously! It helps us continue doing the right things right and the other things better.  We wouldn’t be in business without you, our wonderful customers, so thank you.

As you may have noticed, we have recently changed the way we solicit your feedback. For some of you reading this (our legacy Daxko customers), you’ll remember we used to ask a lot of questions twice a year. For others like our CSI customers, you may have never received a survey at all. Now we are surveying all customers quarterly, with just one question plus an opportunity to provide additional comments. This simple, yet well tested approach, gives us insight in a quick, easy way and increases the likelihood of more people responding.

We care about what’s important to you.  In fact, we read Every. Single. Comment.

Daxko’s goal is to have each of our customers be a RAVING FAN. We know we have to earn this status and are working hard to achieve it. It’s no joke to us.

Finally, once you give us your candid feedback, we get to the best part. Starting with our October 2016 survey, a Daxko team lead will be calling to “close the loop” with many of you who gave us the opportunity to hear your feedback, positive and not-so-positive.

Why do we do this?

We care about what you think, and we want to provide you with EXCEPTIONAL EXPERIENCES.

These surveys help us do that in 3 key ways:

  • Understand your feedback on a deeper level
  • A chance to resolve any outstanding items
  • Share any relevant updates

We think this type of two-way communication is SUPER important for a strong partnership!

So, thanks in advance for your feedback.

 

Molly Harrison is Daxko’s SVP of Services. She and her team work to create exceptional experiences for Daxko customers each and every day.

data-blog

Data is Meaningless (Not Really – Hear Me Out)

By | Board, Industry, Leadership, Mission Delivery, Organizational Health, Trends Reports & Surveys | 3 Comments

As the new Daxko Product Manager focused on all things reporting and analytics across Daxko products, I spend 100% of my time listening to users, documenting needs, and forming and managing plans to ensure that what we do now will improve what is delivered to customers in the short and long terms. This is sincerely fun stuff.

In my 13 years of working with data in different jobs — from U.S. Space Command (yep, you can ask me about satellites) to federal child welfare benchmarking (happy to chat about child well-being trends) to Y-USA and Y data (program, membership and impact – you name it!), my hands-down favorite thing is this…

Data doesn’t answer questions well.

Nope, I’m not kidding.

Intuitively, we all know this. If your blood pressure is 160 over 110, you think, “that’s not good” … BUT if it was 170 over 120 when you measured it two weeks ago, then all of a sudden those very same numbers make you think, “I’m improving! This is good (or at least better)”. Those “bad looking” numbers are telling you you’re moving in the right direction.

As you might infer, “how was that collected?”, “so what?”, “compared to what?” and “well, that depends … “ are my go-to responses. That’s because if we don’t answer these questions we are in danger of not understanding what is actually going on and making bad decisions as a result.

Data need to be many things to be meaningful. At a minimum, it needs the following:

#1: It needs to be correct. A nurse measuring your blood pressure needs to not only know how to use the exact model of the cuff they put on your arm, they also need to read, remember, and write-down the right two numbers while using it. To go one further, the doctor who reads what the nurse wrote has to be able to decipher his or her handwriting or the whole process is nullified. The industry word for this is data integrity. It’s self-explanatory why it’s vital, but it’s also very easily not achieved — or even realized if you don’t have it.

#2: It needs to be presented in context. This is how we know what’s good, bad, or trending in a certain direction. In this example, we have blood pressure guidelines for healthy ranges. Not only do those exist, but there are different ranges for how old you are, if you’re male or female, or if you’re on a plan with your doctor to reach a certain goal. Heck, they can even change over time as new research emerges. Good health care providers will also tell you to consider this information in combination with other factors, such as family history, diet, weight, etc.

#3: It needs to be digestible. You could have access to the best information in the world, but if you can’t explain what you have, you can’t use it. If we all needed to explain systolic (top number) and diastolic (bottom number) of blood pressure, many would feel overwhelmed or get stuck on information that doesn’t answer their questions. In this example, if #1 and #2 above are done well, it’s much easier to take-in your blood pressure ratio than also having to take-in all the research behind it.

I’m drawn to analysis and reporting because good data is different than available data. I would argue that meaningful data is more important than Big Data, we’ve-always-collected-that data, and that’s-interesting data.

So let’s revise what’s above…

Data collected via sound methodologies and presented in appropriate context in a way that can be understood answers questions VERY well.

Daxko is working to give customers accurate, relevant, digestible data to our users. Some of the ways we are making this happen:
  • Improving our data warehouse so all customers will have just the right (depending on the needs of their organization) access to the  data they need
  • Elevating the custom reports user experience to provide easy, quick data points in context that will make a difference to the organization
  • A quick and accurate measurement of the positive difference you are making with your members (think of it like a cause-driven nonprofit NPS Score)
  • Refining the Donor Index to allow fundraisers the ability to create targeted outreach  campaigns just for donors

You can reach me at cmiller@daxko.com if you have thoughts about Daxko data and reporting – I’d love to talk to you.

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Trends & Opportunities: Member Communication

By | Industry, Marketing, Membership, Trends Reports & Surveys, Uncategorized | No Comments

A hefty 28% of respondents said mass e-mail (to the entire membership database) is the most frequently used way to communicate with existing members. 19% are starting to use tools for more targeted communication. 26% of respondents reported using social media as the primary way to communicate with their membership.

Vertical-Bar-ChartIn terms of the most underutilized communication channels, participants agree that text messaging is often overlooked. 37% admit they use that channel the least when communicating with members. However, power of text should not be ignored. Fundraising via text (i.e. text-to-give campaigns) has proven particularly valuable for impulse giving towards disaster recovery efforts. For example, according to Pew Research, text donations accounted for $43 million in Haiti earthquake releif in 2010. “This new mode of engagement offers opportunities to philanthropies and charitable groups for reaching new donors under new circumstances as messages spread virally through friend networks.” (Pew Research, “Real Time Charitable Giving,” January 2012).

Another study linked text reminders for parents with improved flu vaccination rates for children. When a group of parents was given text reminders for their children’s flu vaccine, more than 60% of parents described the reminders as either “the main reason or part of the reason why they brought their children…The parents said that , as well as the text messages providing useful reminders, they also liked how the messages provided information in a quick way that did not require talking to anyone.” (“Flu vaccination rates improved by text reminders,”” Medical News Today, December 2014).

Read the full Trends & Opportunities Report here.

 

 

 

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Trends & Opportunities: Member Satisfaction & Recruitment

By | Downloads, Industry, Marketing, Membership, Trends Reports & Surveys | No Comments

The following post is an excerpt from our annual Trends & Opportunities survey report. Our full 2015 Trends & Opportunities Survey report is available for download.

Member Satisfaction

Conducting member surveys is a great way to collect insight into attrition and satisfaction. The most popular ways to track member satisfaction include annual membership surveys (48%), exit surveys (51%), and collecting member feedback in a suggestion box (49%).

Being proactive about member retention can help an organization get ahead of member cancellations. Still, when attrition occurs, having a plan in place to recover lost members is important. Less than half the organizations surveyed have a member recovery plan.

51% of organizations report they conduct exit surveys to help understand why members are leaving, which is a 6% increase over last year.

Putting more emphasis on continuous feedback (think phone, email, and online) more than once a year could help centers make necessary improvements and lower attrition. Only 22% (compared to 2014’s 30%) of organizations solicit feedback more than once a year. Regular “member pulse checks” maximize interactions with members and give them a voice in the member community.

Member Recruitment

Word-of-mouth referrals are still viewed by organizations as being the most effective communication channel for attracting new members. For the first time, social media (11%) ranked behind word-of-mouth, displacing direct mail as the most effective way to attract new members.

Social media referrals may be catching on as more millennials become members. With this in mind, software provider HootSuite stresses the importance of getting your employees and your loyal followers on the same page when it comes to social:

Give your employees and volunteers a social media education. Many younger employees and volunteers already feel comfortable conversing in the social media realm and you can use that base knowledge to work for your association. Before you give anyone the keys to your social media accounts, be sure they understand how you would like them to communicate professionally in order to further the mission of your nonprofit. A helpful step is to designate one full-time employee to train and monitor the messages that are put out by others on social media. Be sure to set up social media keyword searches so you can quickly identify mentions from all sources.

Recruit loyal members to talk about your organization to their social networks. Have a running club that meets regularly at your center? Is the head of the group active in the local running community? Chances are this person has a lot of influence. HootSuite offers their “ambassadors” brand education, online recognition, and company goodies to encourage them to participate on social media. In this way, loyal members can become ambassadors for your association and for your mission. (“Doing more with Less: how Nonprofits Build Social Media Armies,” HootSuite, May 2014).

Being active on social media can often be an afterthought, but doing the work on the front end will encourage staff and loyal members to participate. Widespread participation creates an active social online community that can enhance your word-of-mouth referrals and further your nonprofit’s mission.

About Trends & Opportunities

Daxko conducts the Trends & Opportunities survey annually to gather insights on nonprofits and the members they serve. This year’s study was fielded in December 2014 via email and included YMCAs, JCCs, Boys and Girls Clubs and other community centers. We had more than 350 member-based nonprofit professionals respond to this survey representing 314 unique associations.