Newbie Spotlight: Meet Barb…

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One of the great things about being new to the DAXKO team is that you usually don’t have to wear the ‘new guy’ hat for long.  We’re always adding A-players to the roster and growing our team.  The ‘Newbie Spotlight’ series is intended to introduce you to these folks and provide a glimpse into what life’s like as a candidate and new team member at DAXKO. (Disclaimer: These are the unedited experiences of our team members.  Don’t be scared by what you read.)

Newbie: Barb, Executive Assistant Extraordinaire

Q: What was your first encounter with DAXKO like?

A: During the interview process, I would sit on a bench in the foyer and wait for my appointment. Not one DAXKO Team Member who walked by ignored me. They were all friendly, saying “Good Morning!” and offering me anything to drink – “Coffee? Soda? Are you SURE I can’t get you something?” Everyone I met was a pleasure.  And on my first work day at DAXKO, they had a welcome card and DAXKO t-shirt waiting for me at my desk. I immediately felt like one of the team.

Q: Did you deliver a presentation during the interview process?  If so, tell us about that experience?

A: I sure did! I was sent home with a Mac book and two different assignments. At first I was a bit nervous – I’d never received a homework assignment from a potential new employer – who does that?  But then I got entirely too excited and carried away. I knew I wanted the job so I was determined to make my presentation the best! I had to learn Keynote and Pages on the fly, and I even managed to throw in a cheesy Uranus joke. I figured they’d either love it or hate it. Lucky for me, DAXKO is the kind of place that seems to embrace quirkiness.

Q: Do you think DAXKO’s interview process is intense?  Why or why not?

A: Intense? No. Thorough? Absolutely. I could tell DAXKO wanted to make certain that I was a good fit for the job and for the culture. It was unlike any interview process I’d ever experienced.

Q: Why do you like the work you’re doing?

A: Working for a busy CEO who has his hands in several different projects keeps things busy and exciting for me. Not only that, but everyone I work with is super cool and friendly – it’s the best work environment I could have ever hoped for.

Q: What’s your favorite thing about working at DAXKO?

A: Besides the endless free coffee? Knowing that I’m part of a growing team full of some of the brightest, friendliest, most creative, unique and hard-working people.

Q: What do you think the profile of the ideal DAXKO team member is?

A: The ideal DAXKO team member is intelligent, energetic, unique, passionate about what they do, eager to learn and grow and, of course, they have to be able to laugh and have fun! They often think outside the box and aren’t afraid to embrace a challenge.

Newbie Spotlight: Meet Val…

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One of the great things about being new to the DAXKO team is that you usually don’t have to wear the ‘new guy’ hat for long.  We’re always adding A-players to the roster and growing our team.  The ‘Newbie Spotlight’ series is intended to introduce you to these folks and provide a glimpse into what life’s like as a candidate and new team member at DAXKO. (Disclaimer: These are the unedited experiences of our team members.  Don’t be scared by what you read.)

Newbie: Val, Quality Assurance Engineer


Q. What was it about DAXKO that first intrigued you?

A. The emphasis on employees and the “team” concept.

Q. What was your first encounter with DAXKO?

A. I met several DAXKO team members at TechBirmingham’s TechMixer EXPO.

Q. During the interview process, what were you surprised to learn about DAXKO?

A. There are no private offices – even the CEO and COO sit in open spaces. AND the CEO is involved in the interview process. (At my last job, I only saw the CEO twice in the 2 years that I worked for him.)

Q. Did you deliver a presentation during the interview process?  If so, tell us about that experience?

A. The presentation was intimidating and somewhat stressful. To be able to present the assignment and handle Q&A in 30 minutes was tricky. I probably over-analyzed the entire presentation (redid it 3 times) and probably had more back copies than anyone has ever brought to the presentation: 3 thumb drives, 1 copy saved to my hard drive, 2 burned CDs, emailed it to my blackberry, and even had handouts just in case I had to go old school . By the time I delivered it, I was more relaxed from over-preparing.

Q. Do you think DAXKO’s interview process is intense?  Why or why not?

A. Absolutely, but that is how they get great team members! The first round of interviews was 3 hours. The second round was an entire afternoon. Both days involved interviewing with multiple team members.

Q. Ultimately, why did you decide to join the DAXKO team?

A. My previous employers really never put an emphasis on employees. Most were just there to ensure that my paycheck was deposited every 2 weeks. DAXKO was different. I really liked the way that they focused on the employee in ensuring that they are part of a team, not individuals just paid for their work. DAXKO offers room for growth, and I’ve never had that before.

Q. Why do you like the work you’re doing?

A. I’m a geek and finding defects is a challenge that intrigues me. If I can find something instead of the customer finding it, then I have a sense of accomplishment.

Q. What’s your favorite thing about working at DAXKO?

A. There are no hidden agendas, personal empire builders, or other selfish behaviors that I’ve experienced in the corporate world. Everyone wants to help everyone else out.  AND our customers are AWESOME!

DAXKO Recruiting: How Many Candidates Do We Interview?

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If there is anything the insertion of technology has done in the hiring process, it’s cheapen the value of each application submitted by a candidate when job hunting.  The old process used to keep a lot of people out of consideration – it took work, including printing your resume, addressing an envelope, maybe doing a cover letter and getting the whole thing out in a timely fashion.

Now, candidates can push send and send out a couple hundred resumes in an afternoon via tools like Monster, CareerBuilder, etc.

Most of which are promptly ignored by the business world.

Which brings me to the point of this post.  Across a few thousand resume/online application submittals, here are the DAXKO stats regarding what the hiring funnel (how many resumes we receive for each position filled, etc.) looks like overall on average to this point in 2009:

  • 62 resumes received/sourced for each open position
  • resulting in 14 phone screens (23%)
  • resulting in 8 first interviews (13%)
  • resulting in 3 second interviews (5%)
  • resulting in 2 third interviews (3%)
  • resulting in 1 hire for the open position in question (1.6%).

Too hard? Too soft? Depends?

First up, I was a little stunned that we actually phone screen 23% of all applicants and interview 13% of those candidates.  The numbers seem a little high to me, and I guarantee you that most Fortune 500s don’t approach those percentages for phone screens and interviews.

But, we don’t use job boards like Monster and CareerBuilder, so the big boards that would drive overall volume for most companies aren’t in play for us.  Which means our capacity to phone screen and interview equates into a higher percentage since the huge resume volume isn’t a problem for us.

Your thoughts?  Always interesting to look at the numbers…

Another Interview Question I’ve Never Used that ROCKS…

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I’m a behavioral interviewer, so I really don’t like questions that don’t ask for examples of past behavior.   But this question, tweeted by Harry
Joiner of eCommerce Recruiter and Marketing Headhunter, is one that I will add to my portfolio:

“Tell me one misperception people (team members) have of you.”

Nice.  As Harry says, this tells if the candidate is self-aware.  Additionally, I think it’s a great window to the soul of what the issues might be if you hire the candidate.  For example, the candidate might say, “one misperception is that I’m unapproachable”.

So you get the answer and turn the focus behaviorial with items like the following:

“Tell me about a specific time when you have sensed a team member feeling that way about you.  What did you do?”

I like it.  I’m adding it to my mix.