Perpetually Evolving

By | Building a Company, Culture, Healthy Stuff, Life at Daxko, Rewarding Careers | No Comments

The Girl and the Software Company: A Love Story

By | Culture, Grow Your Career, Healthy Stuff, Rewarding Careers, Talent, Team Member Spotlight | 2 Comments

In honor of Valentine’s Day, I’m going to tell you a little love story. 

 Our story dates back to 2011, and I was working at a local Birmingham nonprofit. There, I had the great fortune of meeting Lisa, a Daxko team member, who was serving on the board at the time. I was looking for a career change, but I didn’t know what that would look like. I had heard of Daxko, but I wasn’t entirely sure what they did at that point. So, I decided to check out the Daxko careers page and see what this place was all about. 

 And the rest is history… 

 Just kidding. Like most love stories, this one was a slow burn. At the time, there weren’t any roles that would be a good fit for me, but I was intrigued. I loved the idea of working for a tech company where I would still have a connection to the nonprofit world. I stayed in fairly regular communication with the Daxko People Team between 2011 and 2014, hoping that eventually there would be a spot for me. During that time I have (semi) jokingly admitted that I was a Daxko stalker. Then one day in early 2014, opportunity knocked. After several interviews and a presentation, I had an offer with my dream company! 

 What happened after that is hard to summarize, but here’s a snapshot: 3 roles, 7 desks, countless chicken biscuits, and a brief hiatus at another company. Yep, you read that right – I love Daxko so much that I left and came back! In the words of Selena Gomez, the heart wants what it wants.

 A big part of Daxko’s mission is to provide rewarding careers for its team members. Dave likes to refer to this more specifically as “career-defining moments,” and I couldn’t agree more. I’ve had the opportunity to sit across the table from CEOs, CFOs, and every other C that you can imagine. I would not get that chance this early in my career from many other companies. I didn’t have a true “career path” until I became a member of Team Daxko. And while I subscribe mainly to the jungle gym analogy, I have more direction and clarity on what I want to do “when I grow up” than I ever would have if I had never worked at Daxko.

 Like most relationships, there are frustrations, highs and lows, good days and bad, but the bottom line is, you know that someone’s got your back. That’s how I feel about Daxko. We have the greatest team, the best customers, industry-leading products, and yes, we do have a little fun too. It doesn’t hurt that I’ve even found best friends in my Daxko teammates (and as Janna recently pointed out, my dog has made besties through Daxko as well!). 

Rosie and Raisin: BFF

And there you have it, a love story between a girl and a software company. I’m glad to be back in the Daxko Nation, and I’m excited for my next chapter.


Laura G. is a Strategic Relationship Manager who spends her free time food stalking, loving on her dachshund Rosie, and striving to be more like Tina Fey.

Ready to kindle your own love story with Daxko? Read about our careers.

Why I Stand: Tales of the Standing Desk

By | Culture, Healthy Stuff, Life at Daxko | No Comments

It seems like every day there is a new study published advising the general public what we should or should not do. One of these studies has challenged the workplace’s most traditional posture – sitting. Apparently sitting at a desk for 8 hours in a row is unhealthy. I have even heard that sitting has been dubbed the new smoking – sitting all day can take years off your life.

People might think that I (we, the majority of the Customer Success team) stand because it’s healthy or trending or hip. Full disclosure: these reasons may have had something to do with raising my desk many months ago but they sure haven’t sustained my daily vertical posture. In fact, one of the main reasons I stand is so that Jeff P. and I can decorate the shelf-like structure that separates our desk with treasures such as a Justin Bieber Christmas ornament, a Happy Meal toy, and the head of Michelangelo’s David. Because I stand, I know that fellow stander Daniel L. uses intense karate moves to harness his inner zen while on accounting calls. One of the great benefits of standing is that it provides me the daily joy of dropping buckets on my teammates. (For the unenlightened, dropping buckets consists of shooting Daxko stress balls into the trash cans of unsuspecting teammates and making it rain on their heads.) I usually perform the feat after a tough call or a big win with a customer.

Now there are some that don’t stand and that’s totally fine. In fact, I’m a bit of a hybrid myself.

Sometimes when the old legs get tired I borrow Marland H.’s standing desk chair. I know. A standing desk chair is an oxymoron. But I love it. It’s kind of like sitting in a high chair, which is great until people try to feed you food using the air plane method. Marland just had a kid so he’s a regular offender of this gesture but I usually play along… it’s his chair anyway.

But in all seriousness, or as much seriousness as I can muster, standing has shown me that where I work and the people I work with are unbelievable. I hear Gus A. conversing with customers we serve in a caring and helpful way. I see Gabby J. and Justin W. teaming up to give a customer what they need. I am encouraged at Megan G.’s positive attitude as she takes her first call. As I look up from my work I spy Josh A., with his grizzled beard and swagger a college kid would envy, leaving a demo room after showing a turnstile who’s boss. Roy M., a fellow upright compadre, spews knowledge to anyone who visits his desk and reminds me to stretch more as he always seems to be limbering up in some manner. Out of the corner of my eye I see a blur which I assume is Marland scootering at top speed to help a customer on a conference call.

Standing allows for collaboration, efficient briefings, productive and decisive problem solving, and exudes an unwavering feeling that we are all in this together. I’m not sure you can measure what happens on the 5th floor of Daxko the way studies have done with the benefits of standing… and I’m not sure you have to. But something I do know – whatever it is, whatever we have culminated as a team and as a company is indispensable and life giving. And every day, I have the privilege of seeing that from my point of view. Whether I am standing or sitting in Marland’s high chair.


Sam G. is a Customer Success Advocate who enjoys slow mornings, coffee, and homemade waffles with his wife every Saturday.

5 Tips for Taking Ownership of Your Career in the New Year

By | Culture, Free Career Advice, Grow Your Career, Healthy Stuff, Professional Development | No Comments

It’s a new year, which means many people are making resolutions and goals in both their personal and professional lives. One thing that has been on my mind lately is taking the reins on my career. I’m fortunate to work for a company whose mission includes providing rewarding careers to team members. In the long run, though, my career growth is up to me. I think one of the biggest misconceptions people have about the companies they work for is that it’s the company’s responsibility to look after their career. But that’s just not true. Sure, a company can provide great growth opportunities, but ultimately it is the team member who has to work at their own career goals and steer their career toward those growth opportunities.

So, how do you take ownership of your career? Here are five ways to start.

#1: Step out of your comfort zone.
One of our CEO’s favorite sayings is “Get comfortable being uncomfortable,” and this is certainly applicable to your career goals. I would not be in my current role if I hadn’t been willing to take a few risks and explore the unfamiliar. My background is in teaching, training, and writing. Though I was able to carry all of this knowledge over into my role as Talent Marketing Manager, I didn’t come from a marketing background. In truth, I did feel a little uncomfortable during the first few months in this role. This discomfort only encouraged me to work harder and has truly benefited me in the long run, allowing me to develop skills and ideas I didn’t think were possible for me.

#2: Speak up.
If you’re feeling overwhelmed, if something is bothering you, if you have a differing viewpoint or opinion… speak up. I’m going to be honest – this is something I am still working on. It’s probably something I will continue to work on throughout my career. My team lead often reminds me that she doesn’t know how I feel unless I tell her. Earlier in my career, at a different company, I never felt empowered to voice my opinion, and this has carried over into present day. Fortunately, Daxko is huge on transparency, and team members are encouraged to speak up. I have gained more confidence in expressing my thoughts and even saying “no”. If you’re uncomfortable speaking up in person, try writing it out first. It’s okay to practice what you’re going to say before you actually say it. Of course, sometimes “on the spot” can’t be helped; if you’re in a meeting and you want to express a differing opinion, do it thoughtfully, respectfully, and don’t let someone speak over you until you have finished your thought.

#3: Have a long-term goal, and learn skills to help you achieve it.
During my early years at Daxko, I quickly realized that although I enjoyed the training aspect of my job, my ultimate goal was to work on Daxko’s marketing team. When I was a trainer, I sat close to the marketing team and was privy to some of their brainstorms and discussions, and that’s when it clicked: that was the team I wanted to be on. In addition to an Education degree, I have an English degree with a concentration in rhetoric. I was putting my Education degree to use as a trainer, but I have always loved writing and creative processes more than teaching. I recognized that I would be able to put my expertise in persuasive writing to use as a part of the marketing team. Once I had this goal in mind, I began to get to know members of the marketing team and schedule meetings to learn skills from them, such as Pardot and WordPress. These tools helped me in my role as a trainer (I was in charge of the Services monthly newsletter), but the knowledge also gave me an edge when I was interviewing for my marketing role.

#4: Never stop learning.
At Daxko, all team members receive an annual professional development budget to use on courses, books, conferences, or activities that will help us get better at our jobs or learn new skills. In past roles and my current role, I have used part of my professional development money on certification courses to learn more about my field and develop my skillset. Learning shouldn’t stop when you graduate from college. On the contrary, most of the knowledge I have gained through professional development has been more valuable to my career than my college classes. If you work at a company that does not provide a professional development budget, you can still develop your skillset. There are plenty of free or affordable online courses through sites like ALISON, Lynda, and Coursera, just to name a few. Read blogs that pertain to your field. Find thought leaders to follow on Twitter. And ultimately, you won’t know what costs your company might be willing to help cover unless you ask, so keep #2 in mind, speak up, and discuss professional development with your manager.

#5: Find a mentor.
I didn’t have a career mentor until last year. Don’t get me wrong – I have had plenty of mentors in the past who have helped guide and shape me into the person I am today. Last year, though, I sought out a mentor in my field who I could trust not only for career advice, but for professional advice in general. Because I am still fairly young in my career, there have been many situations I have encountered in the workplace that are new to me. That’s why it’s great to have a mentor who is more experienced and who has faced these same situations in the past. When you’re seeking a mentor, I suggest someone in your field (or the field you want to move into) and someone easy to talk to. Many of the conversations I have with my mentor are about our personal lives, and I really value the fact that my mentor has gotten to know me and truly cares about me. I suggest meeting in person once every couple of months (or monthly, if you can swing it) to catch up, and of course, email, call, or text your mentor whenever you need advice.

Remember, your career and development are in your hands. As you think about how to grow in 2017, keep these tips in mind. Have a vision, and make this the year you take strides to achieve it!


Janna B. is Daxko’s Talent Marketing Manager who is slowly becoming a morning person and wishes she lived in the 1960s/70s.

Are you ready to make a career change in the new year? Check out our current opportunities.