Room to Grow

By | Building a Company, Culture, Employment Brand, Grow Your Career, Professional Development, Rewarding Careers | No Comments

Every full-time team member at Daxko is given a significant stipend each year to use for their own professional development. As the leader of a growing company, it’s very important to me that each of us on the team, myself included, continue to grow personally in a rewarding career.

We don’t put a lot of stipulations on how each team member uses their professional development dollars, and that’s because every person’s career, goals, and definition of a rewarding career is going to differ slightly from the next person’s. Team members have used their professional development budget to travel to conferences, continue their formal education, take specific skill-related classes, join associations, earn further accreditations, and the list goes on. By allowing each team member to mold their own development, we allow them another degree of ownership in their career. Sense of ownership is a core value of ours at Daxko.

I recently attended a workshop in Chicago as part of my own professional development. I’m interested in how other successful companies work, so I took part in “The Basecamp Way to Work” event hosted by Jason Fried (Basecamp co-founder & CEO) and Ryan Singer (Strategy at Basecamp). They have a pretty radical work concept with most of their team being remote. As Daxko grows, it’s important to me that our remote team members have an exceptional experience and rewarding career to the same degree that our in-office team members do. So, for me, this was a valuable learning experience.

What professional development channels would be most constructive for you? No matter your role, none of us have “arrived”. We all have room to grow. I challenge you to consider your career, how you would like to see it grow, and then identify your next steps in professional development.

The Girl and the Software Company: A Love Story

By | Culture, Grow Your Career, Healthy Stuff, Rewarding Careers, Talent, Team Member Spotlight | 2 Comments

In honor of Valentine’s Day, I’m going to tell you a little love story. 

 Our story dates back to 2011, and I was working at a local Birmingham nonprofit. There, I had the great fortune of meeting Lisa, a Daxko team member, who was serving on the board at the time. I was looking for a career change, but I didn’t know what that would look like. I had heard of Daxko, but I wasn’t entirely sure what they did at that point. So, I decided to check out the Daxko careers page and see what this place was all about. 

 And the rest is history… 

 Just kidding. Like most love stories, this one was a slow burn. At the time, there weren’t any roles that would be a good fit for me, but I was intrigued. I loved the idea of working for a tech company where I would still have a connection to the nonprofit world. I stayed in fairly regular communication with the Daxko People Team between 2011 and 2014, hoping that eventually there would be a spot for me. During that time I have (semi) jokingly admitted that I was a Daxko stalker. Then one day in early 2014, opportunity knocked. After several interviews and a presentation, I had an offer with my dream company! 

 What happened after that is hard to summarize, but here’s a snapshot: 3 roles, 7 desks, countless chicken biscuits, and a brief hiatus at another company. Yep, you read that right – I love Daxko so much that I left and came back! In the words of Selena Gomez, the heart wants what it wants.

 A big part of Daxko’s mission is to provide rewarding careers for its team members. Dave likes to refer to this more specifically as “career-defining moments,” and I couldn’t agree more. I’ve had the opportunity to sit across the table from CEOs, CFOs, and every other C that you can imagine. I would not get that chance this early in my career from many other companies. I didn’t have a true “career path” until I became a member of Team Daxko. And while I subscribe mainly to the jungle gym analogy, I have more direction and clarity on what I want to do “when I grow up” than I ever would have if I had never worked at Daxko.

 Like most relationships, there are frustrations, highs and lows, good days and bad, but the bottom line is, you know that someone’s got your back. That’s how I feel about Daxko. We have the greatest team, the best customers, industry-leading products, and yes, we do have a little fun too. It doesn’t hurt that I’ve even found best friends in my Daxko teammates (and as Janna recently pointed out, my dog has made besties through Daxko as well!). 

Rosie and Raisin: BFF

And there you have it, a love story between a girl and a software company. I’m glad to be back in the Daxko Nation, and I’m excited for my next chapter.


Laura G. is a Strategic Relationship Manager who spends her free time food stalking, loving on her dachshund Rosie, and striving to be more like Tina Fey.

Ready to kindle your own love story with Daxko? Read about our careers.

Movin’ On Up: How I Managed the ‘Great Move’ from Customer Success to Implementation

By | Culture, Grow Your Career, Life at Daxko, Rewarding Careers, Talent | One Comment

About a month and a half ago, I was given the opportunity to take off my Customer Success hat and move over to the Implementation side of things, as a Project Manager/Solutions Analyst. The dual role would focus on getting our customers started and set for success on Daxko Operations, something with which I had only a little experience, helping launch the YMCA of Memphis & the Mid-South in December of 2015.

As clichéd as it is to say, the departure from the frontline of Customer Success was bittersweet. Feelings of sadness would creep in, even as I was excited about what the new role meant for me. I was anxious to move into something new, something bigger, only to be reminded of how good I had it by a teammate’s playful joking. It’s a good problem to have, not wanting to leave what you’ve got because of how good things are.

I am admittedly very bad with change. I knew that I wanted to move on, but leaving my Customer Success friends was difficult and saddening! What’s more, this was going to be something new and I might not be as comfortable in this new role as I was in my old one. How could I hope to climb to the same level of knowledge as I had in Customer Success?

These worry subsided as I realized a few things:

First, this ‘great move’ that I was worried about was all of twenty feet. Seriously, I can see my old desk and all of the frontline without even standing on my toes. Yes, I know what you’re thinking: I was being dramatic. Perhaps I was. But like most instances, it didn’t feel like ‘just drama’ at the time!

Next, I realized I already knew many people over here, including many teammates who had previously come from Customer Success, such as Kayla Ann, Kelsi, and Deeanna. I had worked with all of these guys for months when I had joined the Customer Success side. They not only made the switch, but were doing excellent work! What I might not know immediately, I could learn just as they had.

I still get to hang out with my former teammates even though all have transitioned to other teams.

I still get to hang out with my former teammates even though all have transitioned to other teams.

The last realization was that I could help lay the foundation for our customers in a way that would ensure their success going forward. While being on the frontline of Customer Success and answering questions for customers is a rewarding experience, having the ability to ensure things go smoothly for launching associations could be seen as a way of answering questions before they happen. I now have the ability to guide our customers through what might otherwise be a painful process, only for them to launch with everything working perfectly. My workflow has shifted from being reactive to proactive.

These three realizations made the transition less painful and substantially less scary. I wrapped up everything I was in the middle of for Customer Success, wrote some how-to guides around a few subjects and made the long, perilous five second walk to my new desk. I found balloons and new friends waiting for me. We went out to lunch at a sandwich place I really enjoy and the rest, as they say, is history.

This kind of cynical let down is the best: when you’re expecting nothing to go right and everything just fits right into place.


McKee S. is a Project Manager who loves playing video games and kickin’ around a hacky sack.

Daxko is looking for another Implementation Project Manager to join McKee and the rest of the team. Think you have what it takes? Apply here!

5 Tips for Taking Ownership of Your Career in the New Year

By | Culture, Free Career Advice, Grow Your Career, Healthy Stuff, Professional Development | No Comments

It’s a new year, which means many people are making resolutions and goals in both their personal and professional lives. One thing that has been on my mind lately is taking the reins on my career. I’m fortunate to work for a company whose mission includes providing rewarding careers to team members. In the long run, though, my career growth is up to me. I think one of the biggest misconceptions people have about the companies they work for is that it’s the company’s responsibility to look after their career. But that’s just not true. Sure, a company can provide great growth opportunities, but ultimately it is the team member who has to work at their own career goals and steer their career toward those growth opportunities.

So, how do you take ownership of your career? Here are five ways to start.

#1: Step out of your comfort zone.
One of our CEO’s favorite sayings is “Get comfortable being uncomfortable,” and this is certainly applicable to your career goals. I would not be in my current role if I hadn’t been willing to take a few risks and explore the unfamiliar. My background is in teaching, training, and writing. Though I was able to carry all of this knowledge over into my role as Talent Marketing Manager, I didn’t come from a marketing background. In truth, I did feel a little uncomfortable during the first few months in this role. This discomfort only encouraged me to work harder and has truly benefited me in the long run, allowing me to develop skills and ideas I didn’t think were possible for me.

#2: Speak up.
If you’re feeling overwhelmed, if something is bothering you, if you have a differing viewpoint or opinion… speak up. I’m going to be honest – this is something I am still working on. It’s probably something I will continue to work on throughout my career. My team lead often reminds me that she doesn’t know how I feel unless I tell her. Earlier in my career, at a different company, I never felt empowered to voice my opinion, and this has carried over into present day. Fortunately, Daxko is huge on transparency, and team members are encouraged to speak up. I have gained more confidence in expressing my thoughts and even saying “no”. If you’re uncomfortable speaking up in person, try writing it out first. It’s okay to practice what you’re going to say before you actually say it. Of course, sometimes “on the spot” can’t be helped; if you’re in a meeting and you want to express a differing opinion, do it thoughtfully, respectfully, and don’t let someone speak over you until you have finished your thought.

#3: Have a long-term goal, and learn skills to help you achieve it.
During my early years at Daxko, I quickly realized that although I enjoyed the training aspect of my job, my ultimate goal was to work on Daxko’s marketing team. When I was a trainer, I sat close to the marketing team and was privy to some of their brainstorms and discussions, and that’s when it clicked: that was the team I wanted to be on. In addition to an Education degree, I have an English degree with a concentration in rhetoric. I was putting my Education degree to use as a trainer, but I have always loved writing and creative processes more than teaching. I recognized that I would be able to put my expertise in persuasive writing to use as a part of the marketing team. Once I had this goal in mind, I began to get to know members of the marketing team and schedule meetings to learn skills from them, such as Pardot and WordPress. These tools helped me in my role as a trainer (I was in charge of the Services monthly newsletter), but the knowledge also gave me an edge when I was interviewing for my marketing role.

#4: Never stop learning.
At Daxko, all team members receive an annual professional development budget to use on courses, books, conferences, or activities that will help us get better at our jobs or learn new skills. In past roles and my current role, I have used part of my professional development money on certification courses to learn more about my field and develop my skillset. Learning shouldn’t stop when you graduate from college. On the contrary, most of the knowledge I have gained through professional development has been more valuable to my career than my college classes. If you work at a company that does not provide a professional development budget, you can still develop your skillset. There are plenty of free or affordable online courses through sites like ALISON, Lynda, and Coursera, just to name a few. Read blogs that pertain to your field. Find thought leaders to follow on Twitter. And ultimately, you won’t know what costs your company might be willing to help cover unless you ask, so keep #2 in mind, speak up, and discuss professional development with your manager.

#5: Find a mentor.
I didn’t have a career mentor until last year. Don’t get me wrong – I have had plenty of mentors in the past who have helped guide and shape me into the person I am today. Last year, though, I sought out a mentor in my field who I could trust not only for career advice, but for professional advice in general. Because I am still fairly young in my career, there have been many situations I have encountered in the workplace that are new to me. That’s why it’s great to have a mentor who is more experienced and who has faced these same situations in the past. When you’re seeking a mentor, I suggest someone in your field (or the field you want to move into) and someone easy to talk to. Many of the conversations I have with my mentor are about our personal lives, and I really value the fact that my mentor has gotten to know me and truly cares about me. I suggest meeting in person once every couple of months (or monthly, if you can swing it) to catch up, and of course, email, call, or text your mentor whenever you need advice.

Remember, your career and development are in your hands. As you think about how to grow in 2017, keep these tips in mind. Have a vision, and make this the year you take strides to achieve it!


Janna B. is Daxko’s Talent Marketing Manager who is slowly becoming a morning person and wishes she lived in the 1960s/70s.

Are you ready to make a career change in the new year? Check out our current opportunities.