Five Years at Daxko

By | Culture, Grow Your Career, Life at Daxko, Rewarding Careers, Talent, Team Member Spotlight | No Comments

Anniversaries are kind of a big deal here at Daxko. Nope, not wedding anniversaries. Daxko-versaries. This month, I’m celebrating five years at Daxko, and I’m still so happy and grateful to work for such an amazing company. I’ve learned a lot in my time at Daxko – not only about navigating a career, but also plenty about myself. From developing a training program for new hires to crossing off a ton of states from my travel bucket list to landing a dream role as a marketer, I can truly say I’ve had an outstanding experience.

Of course, I’ve also had a lot of fun here, too. As you can see from the photo above, I take Daxko Halloween very seriously and have dressed as Wednesday Adams, Lydia from Beetlejuice, one of the twins from The Shining (along with my sister, who is also a Daxko team member), and a Ghostbuster in the past.

One of Daxko’s core values is synergistic teamwork, and working closely with other folks within the company has also helped me gain a lot of friends. Meg H. is one of those friends! She and I were on the Education Team at the same time, and we traveled a bit together to train our customers on Daxko’s software. I recently sat down with Meg, who will soon be celebrating her seven year Daxko-versary, to talk about our favorite memories, our career growth, and what we’ve learned during our time at Daxko.

Here’s to five more years! I can’t wait to see what I learn and how I grow as I continue my Daxko journey.


Janna S. is Daxko’s Talent Marketing Manager who is obsessed with animals and who often wishes she lived in the 1960s/1970s.

The Blueprint Podcast with David Lamb: Dave Gray Episode

By | Board, Events & Happenings, Industry, Leadership, Organizational Health | No Comments

Recently, Daxko CEO, Dave Gray, spoke with David Lamb on his Blueprint Podcast. In each episode of the podcast, Lamb speaks with business leaders in and around Birmingham to bring listeners local success stories.

When asked about how he got into start-ups, Dave talks about his early career in Chicago and then in Atlanta, working for a Silicon Valley-based company. He talks about tough times weathering the Dotcom crash and then soon after, being acquired. Gray says that even though all those times were rough, he decided that he always wanted to stay involved with growth-oriented companies.

“I decided that I never want to work for a ‘normal’ company again,” says Gray.

He goes on to explain what appealed and still appeals to him about that atmosphere, “I like the pace and the amount of change that happened. I found that to be intellectually challenging and I found it to be just invigorating and so I thought, ‘I’m going to keep doing early-stage stuff.’ Now I’ve been working in the same place for almost 15 years and I wouldn’t categorize what we’re doing as early stage but it certainly is growth-oriented and change-oriented and I just tend to like that. ”

When asked about his early work experience and what that instilled in him, Gray is quick to go back even further than his professional career. “I worked a full time job in college for the last couple of years I was there and I was working 40-hours a week or more and I was taking a full course load and we were doing a lot of project work and I was playing intramural sports and hanging out with my friends and I think I learned how to manage time…or not sleep much, maybe a combination of the two and so I think some of those early experiences were really more about work ethic.”

“The experience I had with that Silicon Valley startup was really more about product and market positioning.  I am an observer and watching…the CEO and the decisions he was making and when the times got rough and listening to his explanations and really taking the blame for why things turned out the way they did. It was an interesting thing to observe a leader going through that….How would I handle that if I was in the same position? Or, How would I try to avoid being in that position in the future? I think those things primed me to be ready to prepare to experience those kinds of things.”

If you’re curious about inception of Daxko or leaders that inspire Gray, those topics and more are covered in the full podcast:

A Bona Fide Recruiter’s Top 5 Resume Tips

By | Culture, Free Career Advice, Grow Your Career, Job Hunt, Rewarding Careers | 2 Comments

I review thousands of resumes every year that represent thousands of candidates who would love to work for Daxko. I’ve seen some truly great resumes, and I’ve also seen some that are not so great. A great resume is a must-have regardless of the career you want, and these are my top five tips for creating a resume that will get noticed at Daxko (and likely anywhere else you apply).

#1: Design matters.

The role you apply for will dictate just how creative you should be with your design, but any resume should have a design that makes it easy to read and find the pertinent information. Keep in mind that the average recruiter or hiring manager spends about six seconds reviewing a resume before making a decision to look further or move on (but lucky for you, we’re not average here at Daxko).

You don’t have to be a graphic designer to have a nicely formatted resume, either. You can find templates on Microsoft Word and Google Docs; or, if you want a fancier format, you can find some on Freepik or Creative Market. And if you are a graphic designer or applying for a creative position, please don’t come at me with an ugly Indeed resume with no formatting!

#2: Like a good suit, the best resumes are tailored.

Your resume should be tailored to the job you are applying for, not for any job at any company. I’ve heard many people compare interviewing to dating, and that comparison really works well here. When you’re dating, you want to feel like your date really wants to be with YOU, not just any warm body. Employers have feelings, too… and we want to know you want THIS job at THIS company.

#3: Objectives are so 1996.

If you’re applying for a job, we’ll assume that your objective is to get said job. Instead, use that valuable resume space to provide a summary of your experience or to highlight some of your career successes. If you’re a new grad or someone just entering the workforce, focus on classes you’ve taken that are applicable or successes while in school (did you maintain a 4.0 while working to support yourself through school?)

Other things to leave off your resume include:

  • References – We’ll ask for those separately if you make it to that point in the interview process. Save that space on your resume for more useful information.
  • College details from more than a decade ago – Most employers don’t care what sorority you were a part of in 1998. Internships also take up valuable real estate on your resume and can be removed for anyone more than 5 years out of school (unless your internship was especially noteworthy/career defining).

#4: Everyone loves a mystery… except on your resume.

Don’t make me guess or jump through hoops to get the information I need. What do I mean by this? Well for starters, make sure you put your contact information at the top of your resume. Don’t hide it at the bottom, or even worse, forget to include it altogether. And your LinkedIn profile is great, but I want an email and a phone number to reach you (call me old school).

I also don’t want to guess about your work history – include dates and locations. I’ve yet to meet a recruiter who actually enjoys reading functional resumes; so skip that, include your work history, and write a cover letter if necessary.

#5: Check yo’ self (before you wreck yo’ self).

Really though, proofread your resume… and then have someone else proofread it for you. You don’t want silly grammatical or spelling issues to stand between you and your dream job! It’s almost laughable how many resumes I see with “detailed oriented”… you’ve just got to love the irony there! I can look past a typo, but if you can’t string a few words together without me shaking my head, we have a problem.

There are probably several more I can think of, but these stand as my top 5. If you have questions, or want to tell me how wrong I am about functional resumes… good news! We’re hosting another #AskDaxko Twitter chat on Wednesday, July 19th, at 11:30 AM. We’ll chat for an hour about resume do’s and don’ts, our favorite formats and fonts, and all that jazz. Got a question, but can’t join live? Feel free to send it in ahead of time using the #AskDaxko hashtag, and we’ll address it during our chat. Hope to “meet” you in the Twittersphere!


Beth Wolfe is Daxko’s Senior Talent Acquisition Specialist who is from the beach, but thinks Birmingham is waayyy cooler; and who enjoys any Seinfeld reference worked into everyday conversations.

Process, the Perfect Team, and Psychological Safety

By | Building a Company, Culture, Healthy Stuff, Life at Daxko | No Comments

In 2013, Sam Hinkie took the helm as the general manager of an ailing Philadelphia 76ers (basketball) team and established what people refer to now as “The Process”. The Process was a calculated and devised plan to, over the course of several years, get the best young talent to the land of brotherly love where they could ball out. But like all good things, the process took time and included several (terrible) losing seasons, backlash from fans, and ridicule by analysts.

Hinkie, despite the controversy surrounding his tactics, was committed to The Process. Every act that he took, every decision his front office made, and every trade that he conjured was centered on his end goal: winning basketball games and building a franchise. Unfortunately, Hinkie supporters ran out of patience, and in 2016, he was forced out just a season away from the process finally (hopefully) yielding its first fruits.

Unlike the 76ers, Daxko has been a solid organization for years. But the similarity they share with the 2013-2016 76ers is the conviction that process is vital to progress. Understanding process increases scope and vision for where and what we want to be. I joined the Customer Success Team during a rebuilding phase; people were changing roles and moving on to other things during a busy time of year. Trusting the process was not easy when the phones wouldn’t stop ringing and cases piled up. The urge to overcompensate with impulsive hirings or knee-jerk reactions to problems were tangible. But with time, our a resilient and committed team weathered the storm. As we rebuilt, we became more tenured and experienced and, through deliberate hirings, we became stronger in number and proficiency. Now, a year and half later, our squad is stacked.

In trusting our process, did we achieve what we aimed to do? I guess it depends. The process of building a good team may not be able to quantify the intangibles that comprise a great one. Google, a company who prides itself on process and vision, recently conducted a study to uncover the characteristics of a perfect team. The study (Project Aristotle), despite pouring over decades of social and psychological group behavior and case studies on Google employees, found it hard to determine exactly what makes a great team. What they came to realize is that the lack of consistent patterns was because great teams took so many different forms. Some teams were balanced across the board which helped equally distribute duties. Other teams’ strengths varied but were able to give teammates tasks that fit their skill set. All in all, they identified two behavior traits that ran through the variations of great teams. One was what researchers call “equality in distribution of conversational turn-taking” which is a fancy way of saying that everyone on the team spoke an equal amount during team meetings. The other was social sensitivity, which is when people are aware of nonverbal cues: tone of voice, body language, group dynamics, facial expression, etc.

These observations comprise parts of what is known as “psychological safety”. The article quotes Amy Edmondson, a professor at Harvard Business School, when she says psychological safety is a ‘‘shared belief held by members of a team that the team is safe for interpersonal risk-taking.’’ Psychological safety is ‘‘a sense of confidence that the team will not embarrass, reject or punish someone for speaking up … it describes a team climate characterized by interpersonal trust and mutual respect in which people are comfortable being themselves.’’

It seems that for teams to succeed, there must be a good process in place to build for scale and growth, bring in all-stars, and craft a crew that can perform. But what may be the crux of impactful work, meaningful careers, and a successful team rests in the truth that to be excellent is to value those around you. Where work becomes excellent out of a sense of joy rather than a sense of fear, resilience replaces timidity, employees are teammates, and culture is a communal commitment to who we are and what we hope to be.


Sam G. is a Customer Success Advocate who enjoys slow mornings, coffee, and homemade waffles with his wife every Saturday.